STAMPS TO KNOWLEDGE

Biography UNCLE REMUS

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS

Joel4.jpg
cachet by W.M.Grandy
Joel3.jpg
Cachet by Fulton Stamp Co.

Joel Chandler Harris Born in Eatonton Georgia on December 9, 1845 (not 1848, as traditionally believed and shown on these FDC's.) His mother, Mary Ann Harris, had left Richmond County to live in Eatonton, the original hometown of her maternal grandmother, Tabitha Turman. She would take odd jobs to make herself financially independent, Mary Harris took in sewing and helped neighbors with gardening.
  Joel was an undersized, carrot-topped, freckled-faced boy who had a robust sense of humor and was a  practical joker. In part, his joking and pranking may have been a way of masking a slight stammer, which was his lifelong affliction.
  Harris at thirteen left home and became an apprentice to Joseph Addison Turner, a newspaper publisher and plantation owner. It was at this plantation, Turnwold, that Harris often heard black field hands relate folktales of their native Africa, these were to make him famous. During his free time, Harris used the plantation's library to study authors such as Chaucer, Dickens, Milton, and Poe. In 1866, Harris had taken a job as a typesetter with the Macon Telegraph. This job opened doors for expansion in the literary world. He became the associate editor of Savannah Morning News by 1870. With the success of his career he also became aquainted with Esther LaRose with whom he fell in love and married on April 20, 1873. Esther and Harris had two children by 1876 and then had seven more in the years to come. Harris and his family left Savannah and moved to Atlanta trying to escape a yellow fever epidemic of which 3 of their children died.
 He became associate editor of the Constitution giving it national recognition When Harris was asked to write dialect stories for the paper, he recalled the time he spent at "Turnwold" and began composing stories about an old Black he gave the name of Uncle Remus. The first Uncle Remus sketch was published in 1876. The Uncle Remus stories appealed to readers from all different backgrounds. It was appealing, because Harris took the common man...and gave him  cunning, humor, and either power or compassion . The Uncle Remus series became instant classics. Between 1876 and 1881, Harris published thirty-four stories to add to his Uncle Remus series and gained the attention of famous authors such as Mark Twain and George W. Cable. Twain admired Harris' work of Uncle Remus and initiated correspondence with him expressing his appreciation of Uncle Remus saying it is a work if artistic creation .
Harris was known as a master storyteller of his time. He would go outside of himself and become the heart and soul of the plantation Negro who was at the opposite end of the social structure...In May 1908 he became ill and was diagnosed with acute nephritis and cirrhosis of the liver. While he was on bed rest, Harris was Baptized a Catholic. Joel Chandler Harris died on Friday, June 3, 1908 at the age of fifty-nine.

Joel2.jpg
Cachet by Fleetwood
Joel1.jpg
Cachet by L.W.Staehle for CachetCraft

Read More on Uncle Remus(Joel Chandler Harris)click Here

All covers on this site are from my personal collection some or similar ones to those shown are for sale using our links page to MishMosh Stamps & FDC's at Ebid.net.The Addresses have been removed from most of the FDC's for this site to protect the previous owners personal privacy.

Home
Famous Americans
Women in U.S.History
Events in History 1
Black Heritage Series
NATO - North Atlantic Treaty Organization
PONY EXPRESS
Biography MOINA MICHAELS
BASEBALL CENTENNIAL
SPORTS LEGENDS on Stamps
Interactive
What do You Know of the Declaration of Independence
Contact Us
FAQ's
Related Links

Website Created by Phil Nocerino, Hosted by FatCow.com